dsc_0633Dental Health

Adults

In recent years, bacterial inflammation involved in gum disease has been linked to chronic health problems like stroke, coronary artery disease and premature, low birth weight babies. Our doctors and hygienists take great care to identify and treat gum disease early to keep you and your mouth healthy.

 

Periodontics

Periodontal simply means, “the tissue around the teeth.” Periodontists specialize in the treatment and surgery of this area, which is often characterized by gum disease. Plaque is the most common element causing gum disease.

Unfortunately, Periodontal-related problems are often discovered after they have been persistent for an extended period of time. Proper oral hygiene, daily dental care, and regular dental checkups will minimize the risk of gum disease. Gum disease ranges from mild (gingivitis) to moderate (periodontitis). Treatments are available for every case of gum disease.

Common problems associated with gum disease:

  • Receding gum lines expose the root portion of your teeth
  • Discolored or deteriorating tooth structure
  • Gum depressions (holes in between the teeth and the gum tissue)
  • Infected gum line (discoloration or inflammation of the gum tissue)
  • Tooth loss or tooth movement

 

The effects of gum disease can be damaging to your dental health. However, through proper preventive care and oral hygiene, you can avoid problems associated with gum disease.

Children

Innumerable studies and research have concluded the importance of starting children early in their lives with good dental hygiene and oral care. According to research, the most common chronic childhood disease in America is tooth decay, affecting 50 percent of first-graders and 80 percent of 17-year-olds. Early treatment prevents problems affecting a child’s health, well-being and self-image and overall achievement.

The National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research estimates that children will miss 52 million hours of school each year due to oral health problems and about 12.5 million days of restricted activity every day from dental symptoms. Because there is such a significant loss in their academic performance, the Surgeon General has made children’s oral health a priority.

Parents are responsible for ensuring their children practice good dental hygiene. Parents must introduce oral care early in a child’s life- as early as infancy. The American Dental Hygiene Association states that a good oral hygiene routine for children includes:

  • Thoroughly cleaning your infant’s gums after each feeding with water-soaked infant cloth. This stimulates the gum tissue and removes food.
  • Gently brushing your baby’s erupted teeth with a small, soft-bristled toothbrush and using a pea-sized amount of fluoridated toothpaste.
  • Teaching your child brushing and gentle flossing techniques.
  • Regular visits with their dentist to check for cavities in the primary teeth and for possible developmental problems.
  • Encouraging your child to discuss any fears they may have about oral health visits, but not mentioning words like “pain” or “hurt” since this may instill the possibility of fear.
  • Determining if the water supply that serves your home is fluoridated; if not, discussing supplemental options with your dentist or hygienist.
  • Asking your hygienist or dentist about sealant application to protect your child’s teeth.